Monday, 15 September 2014

Moten Word for the Day

ivalstu|l /ivalstuʎ/, verb: “to dream, to fantasise (about)”

Recursive sleep. Mmm… I could do with some of that!

So, this will be the last verb based on istu|l for now. After so many examples, you should have got an idea of how productive this verb is :).

In terms of morphology, this verb is formed with va|le, a noun meaning “image”, “idea” or “fantasy”. Here again, va|le is in its short compound form val-. So “to dream” is “to summon an idea”.

In terms of semantics, it mainly means “to dream”, but can also mean “to fantasise” (or “to imagine”), when the fantasy in question is considered implausible or at least the speaker treats it that way. When someone fantasises about things that are plausible, in Moten one will use the verb ivalpinasi instead, which is also a compound with va|le, but in this case with the verb ipinasi: “to feel, to look”, a verb that is worth an entry in this series all for itself, so I will not discuss it further for now ;).

Questions?


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Saturday, 13 September 2014

Moten Word for the Day

ikulstu|l /ikulstuʎ/, verb: “to create a language, to conlang”

It only gets worse with age…

So, a conlang having a word for conlanging. So meta! ;)

Seriously, this verb is simply formed by adding ku|lu: “language, tongue” to istu|l, making conlanging literally “to summon a language” (more probably, it’s some kind of portmanteau between ku|lu and idatistu|l: “to invent”, or at least it was coined based on that verb). Notice that ku|lu in this compound comes out as kul-. It’s what I call the “short compound form”. Stems can form compounds in both full form and short compound form, although it’s usually not predictable which form will be preferred.

Two interesting facts about ikulstu|l:

  • it’s the base word for referring to conlanging. Other words (such as kulstuluz: “conlang”, kulstulbel: “conlanging” and kulstulnon: “conlanger”) are derived from it. It’s quite common in Moten for the base word that refers to some concept to actually be a verb, and other words, including nouns, to be derived from it. That’s unlike English, where conceptual base words tend to be nouns.
  • It’s strictly a transitive verb, taking as object the language being created (or its name at least). That’s why the form kulstuluz, which is actually the participle of the verb, can take on the meaning “conlang”: the participle when used as a noun usually refers to the object of the verb. In fact, even when the object is not mentioned in a sentence, it will be implied (that’s pro-drop for you! :) ). It is possible, however, to remove the object entirely from the equation (i.e. if you want to say that you are conlanging in general, without any reference to which conlang you are working on), by putting the verb in the middle voice, a very common way in Moten to turn transitive verbs into generic intransitive ones.

Questions?


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Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Moten Words for the Day

idatistu|l /idatistuʎ/, verb: “to make up, to think up, to create, to invent”

ipistu|l /ipistuʎ/, verb: “to build, to construct, to create, to invent”

In this case, created awesomeness! :P

Today, two verbs based on istu|l instead of one! And all because they are similar in meaning and form a natural group :).

In Moten, there’s not a single word for “thing”. Rather, Moten works similarly to Japanese by separating things into “concrete things” (mono in Japanese, ipi in Moten) and “abstract things (koto in Japanese, dati in Moten). Basically, ipi means “thing, object, tool, machine”, while dati means “thing, concept, way, manner”. And when combined with istu|l, they form two different verbs both meaning basically “to create” or “to invent”, with ipistu|l focussed on the creation of concrete things (hence “to build”) and idatistu|l focussed on the creation of abstract things (hence “to think up”).

So “to invent” in Moten is literally “to summon a thing” :).

Questions?


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Sunday, 7 September 2014

Moten Word for the Day

ibivostu|l /ibivo̞stuʎ/, verb: “to count, to measure”

I kept getting memes about the wrong kind of “count” (and most measuring memes were NSFW ;) ).

This time, we have istu|l added to the noun bivo: “quantity, number”. It means “to count” when referring to discrete items, and “to measure” when referring to continuous ones (which is in line with bivo's main sense of “quantity”). Here again, istu|l is mostly a semantically bleached quasi-suffix here, although the idea that “to count” translates as “to summon a number” is not that far-fetched :).

Questions?


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Friday, 5 September 2014

Moten Word for the Day

ipa|nastu|l /ipaɲastuʎ/, verb: “to give birth to (s.o.)”

I actually did, until I decided to stop caring. Long story.

In any case, here we have a compound of istu|l with the noun pa|na: “birth”. It’s getting a bit more difficult to argue that istu|l still has its main meaning intact here (“to give birth” as “to summon birth”? Can work, but is a bit weird). It’s more a semantically bleached quasi-suffix used to form a verb out of a noun (as I mentioned before, Moten stems are usually stuck in a single part of speech, unlike say English stems which are happy to be verbed and nouned freely).

One thing I need to mention is that ipa|nastu|l is the standard verb used to refer to someone’s birth. But it focusses on the mother’s action, unlike the English “to be born”, which focusses on the child. So if you want to say that you were born on the 25th of March, you actually have to say in Moten that someone gave birth to you on that date. Since Moten is aggressively pro-drop, you don’t have to specify a subject at all, but it’s still considered present. The expression looks like this:

Gdan zoba|saj (opa) egevel|ziza ipa|nastu|l etok.

Literally: “gave birth to me on March 25th” (the word in parentheses is opa: “and”, which is optionally present between the name of the month and the name of the day).

Questions?


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Thursday, 4 September 2014

Moten Word for the Day

ipenlastu|l /ipe̞nlastuʎ/, verb: “to invite; to ask out”

And then? Looks to me that this plan hasn’t been thought out thoroughly enough ;).

Once again we are looking at a verb-verb compound, this time with istu|l compounded with ipenlaj: “to wait for; to expect”. In other words, that verb means literally “to summon and wait”, which is pretty much what inviting people is about (I always get nervous waiting for people to show up, and constantly worrying they won’t actually bother…).

So far, all the compounds I’ve shown “make sense”, i.e. in those compounds istu|l is used in a way that is semantically meaningful. In the next compounds though, it will only be used as a sort of “verbal carrier”, i.e. a semantically bleached suffix there to ensure the resulting word is a verb. So expect a bit more variety in the next words for the day! :)

Questions?


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Tuesday, 2 September 2014

Moten Word for the Day

ipe|lastu|l /ipe̞ʎastuʎ/, verb: “to show; to reveal”

Yeah, couldn’t find anything better. Vepe|ne ! ;)

As promised, this one is slightly more interesting than the previous compound. First, it is a verb-verb compound, something that speakers of European languages won’t be very familiar with. It’s also a dvandva compound, i.e. a compound where both elements are at the same level and are connected with a notional “and”.

It is formed by adding ipe|laj: “to see, to watch” to istu|l. The resulting verb ipe|lastu|l literally means “to summon and see”, which is basically what “showing” or “revealing” is (calling someone so that they can see something :) ).

Verb-verb compounds are common in Moten, so don’t be surprised if you see a few more appearing in this series, or even afterwards ;).

Questions?


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